Definition of radioactive dating in chemistry

Rated 3.81/5 based on 982 customer reviews

Radioactive dating is a method of dating rocks and minerals using radioactive isotopes.

This method is useful for igneous and metamorphic rocks, which cannot be dated by the stratigraphic correlation method used for sedimentary rocks. Some do not change with time and form stable isotopes (i.e.

It then takes the same amount of time for half the remaining radioactive atoms to decay, and the same amount of time for half of those remaining radioactive atoms to decay, and so on. The amount of time it takes for one-half of a sample to decay is called the half-life of the isotope, and it’s given the symbol: It’s important to realize that the half-life decay of radioactive isotopes is not linear.

definition of radioactive dating in chemistry-77

definition of radioactive dating in chemistry-54

It can be used on objects as old as about 62,000 years.

This decay process leads to a more balanced nucleus and when the number of protons and neutrons balance, the atom becomes stable.

This radioactivity can be used for dating, since a radioactive 'parent' element decays into a stable 'daughter' element at a constant rate.

those that form during chemical reactions without breaking down).

The unstable or more commonly known radioactive isotopes break down by radioactive decay into other isotopes.

Leave a Reply